‘Team orders’ have not go too well with both the organizers and the other competing teams and has been banned but it was apparent that Massa, who led through much of the race ‘allowed’ Alonso to overtake him after he received a radio message from Rob Smedley, the race engineer who told Massa that Alonso is faster than him during Lap 48. How one decipher the message was further compounded when Smedley ‘apologized’ to Massa later. Massa also looked unhappy during the post-race press conference. He is 38 points behind Alonso.

The FIA then called on Stefano Domenicali, the team principal, Massimo Rivola, the team manager and the drivers for questioning. FIA then imposed a US100,000 fine on Ferrari with the final results to be decided if they would be altered by the World Motor Sport Council. This could mean that Ferrari might lose their proud 1-2 result in Germany. Red Bull Racing’s Sebastien Vettel finished third in Germany while Lewis Hamilton and Jenson Button finished fourth and fifth while Mark Webber, Vettel’s teammate followed behind. Seventh place when to Robert Kubica of Renault while Nico Rosberg was eighth and Michael Schumacher was ninth, a position he has become pretty much familiar with.

The ban on team orders was stated under Article 39.1 and Article 151c for bringing the sport into disrepute. The FIA imposed the rule on team orders which were rampant particularly with the Prancing Horse where an incident when Rubens Barichello who was the second driver for Ferrari had to ‘move aside’ for Michael Schumacher to win the race while Schumi also did the same for Eddie Irvine at the 1999 Malaysian GP at the final lap. The FIA banned these orders in 2003.

 

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